Arran Coastal Way – Plan B! (Part two) – Blackwaterfoot and Kilmory

Blackwaterfoot has some great, and very popular (!) community toilets , a village shop / newsagents, a butchers and a store / post office so is a good place to wait for a bus for an hour and half. I lay down on the grass and listened to podcasts in the sunshine…bliss! The Danish couple from the morning turned up and the worn out looking walker from earlier in the day arrived in the back of a car. He’d had to get a lift and leave his friends walking as he was just too tired to go on (unfortunately they didn’t make it back in time for their bus to catch the ferry, so had to get a taxi – hope they made it!) It was nice to chat to people whilst I waited and a bit of people watching is always entertaining!

My stop for the night was at Kilmory Haven which is actually a bunkhouse/ village hall / bar all rolled into one. They had assured me that I could camp there free of charge when I had messaged them previously, but it was a bit vague, so I was a little bit worried they had forgotton! There was no need to worry…it turned out I would be camping in the school playing field over the weekend. A bit strange but actually this turned out to be the best place to stay for two nights, I had the field to myself and a fantastic view over the sea to Ailsa Craig in the distance. The lovely friendly people in the hall let me use the kitchen and the toilets inside and I could help myself to coffee whenever I wanted one, in fact they even made me one when I went in to ask to fill my water bottle. The bar was open in the evenings and although there were people coming and going until early hours I felt perfectly safe in my little field tucked away!

View over to Ailsa Craig – the little bump behind the house!
The view the other way! But very peaceful with no-one in the school at the weekend.

I would definitely come back here again, mabe even treat myself to a bed in the bunkhouse!

Arran Coastal Way – Plan B! (Part One) – Kings Cave to Blackwaterfoot.

Plan B = take the bus!

Arran has a great bus service which goes all the way around the island and across the middle, I know it’s cheating but the next stage was a long drag mainly along the road so I decided to see it from a bus window and pick the best bits!

The plan was to get a weekly ticket (£21.50) so that I could just hop on and off when I wanted along the way. Today I was heading down to Kings Cave and walking on to Blackwaterfoot and then hopping back on to get to where I was staying at Kilmory.

I packed up camp and headed to the bus stop just down the road outside the Lochranza Distillery, the sun was shining and I felt at peace with my decision to use the bus. I waited…and I waited…chatted to a friendly Danish couple who had also turned up … and we waited… erm…no bus! We all looked at the timetable again and realised we had read it wrong and the bus wasn’t turning up for another hour…doh!! A great excuse to get a coffee at the distillery where the friendly staff let me leave my bag in a cupboard while I relaxed with a lovely proper coffee (this is a recurring theme..I love coffee and usually at home I have one of those hob espresso makers…packet Kenco just wasn’t cutting it!!) The distillery has a very nice cafe with great views.

Lochranza Distillery

The bus arrived bang on time and the driver sorted out my ticket, well he thought he had but apparently it was a new system with a plastic card and he wasn’t sure if it would work… It didn’t and for most of the rest of the week I had to keep hold of my increasingly battered receipt as proof of purchase! Didn’t matter, all the bus drivers were lovely and just laughed if they’d seen me before! He dropped me right by the start of the Kings Cave walk and told me which way to go for the best views on the way down.

Views on path to Kings Cave

It was a lovely walk down, clearly marked through Forestry Commision land with tall pine trees opening out to amazing views. I met three walkers coming up, obviously they’d been further than me as one of them looked completely worn out! A steep path down to the rocky beach and then onto the cave. Now…I’ll be honest…it was a little disappointing! I’m not sure what I was expecting but photos I’d seen had made it look so much more impressive. I did stand at the gated entrance and think..maybe if the teenagers and hubby were here and I wasn’t on my own, it would be a bit more exciting, they would go and explore and want to find out how far it went and I’d get caught up in their enthusiasm, some things just aren’t the same on your own. I did however love all the stone piles which seemed to go on forever inside a smaller cave and the cut through with the view of the sea.

By now the sun was lovely and warm, I found a spot just before Drumadoon Point for some lunch and to make sure the tide was definitely going out before attempting the walk around the headland.

Lunch with a great view

Another boulder field, this time with quite a well-laid path and strategically placed boulders to follow but still tiring with a big rucksack. Made it round without being swept away to sea which is always good (!) and onto the start of Blackwaterfoot beach. Soft sand is really draining to walk on! Eventually the sand got harder and I made it to Blackwaterfoot with hot feet and gasping for another cup of coffee. It was so nice to take off my shoes and relax for a while after refilling my water bottle and finding coffee (Unfortunately the bakery and sandwich shop were both shut but the hotel came to the rescue!)

Arran Coastal Way – Sannox to Lochranza

After a windy, rainy night the morning was grey and drizzly but somehow managed to get the tent packed up reasonably dry and headed off. I was having problems with my solar charger so my phone was on really low battery which of course meant very few photos again – a bit frustrating to say the least!

Over the stepping stones at Sannox and on to North Sannox picnic area. This was one of our wild campervanning spots many, many years ago so I was looking forward to see how it had changed since then. A bigger parking area but the rest looked pretty much the same until I got onto the path to the Fallen Rocks. I’m sure when we were here about ten years ago this was a small rough path, as it is further on, but now it has obviously been taken over by the Forestry Commission and turned into a slightly ugly, wide stone track. There has obviously been felling around the area, so I guess a decent track was necessary, but a bit of a shame.

The path further on meanders around the Fallen Rocks and onto a long grassy stretch all the way to the now deserted Laggan Cottage. This was a good sight to see as I came around the headland, it meant it was time for a stop and some munchies. Laggan Cottage is deserted but open to have a nosy around, it looks like people obviously bunk down in there overnight at times but otherwise it was dark and dingy with the windows boarded up. What a shame that it’s just being left to decay, it must have an interesting history but I am struggling to find out much about it online but will keep trying! I was kicking myself for not having a camera at this point.

I pulled up a chair in the doorway of the cottage and rested my feet while munching my very tasty lunch of oatcakes and pre-packed tuna mix -surprisingly delicious even if it looked like I was eating from a cat food pouch!! I was feeling really tired at this point and wondered how I was ever going to get to Lochranza…

Heaving my bag back on, I carried on to the ruins of the Duchess Anne’s Salt Pans which proved to be a good spot to get out of the wind for a bit, put on more layers and psych myself up for the next bit….the dreaded boulder field…

Over the first few boulders I heard a deep thwumping sound coming from the sea hitting a gap in the boulders and sucking back out again and looked along to see a swan calmly sitting in a large rock as the tide rushed in towards it. That put a smile on my face which was much needed as I got to An Scriordan Rock Fall.

If the weather had been sunny and calm, if I hadn’t got a bloomin’ heavy rucksack on my back and if my feet weren’t killing me at this point, I’m sure this would have been an enjoyable experience but I can honestly say it wasn’t. Big boulders to clamber over, narrow path between rocks, and overhanging rocks strategically placed to knock your rucksack to the side as you clambered. There was an awful lot of swearing involved! Towards the end, as I pulled myself up onto another boulder and shouted ‘For F*** Sake’ for the hundredth time, a young, good-looking Italian(?) guy appeared around a rock with a slightly shocked look on his face…oops! I politely said ‘Hello’ and then carried on swearing, slightly quieter this time!! I really never thought this part would end.

Coming down off the rock fall and seeing the lovely little white cottage of Fairy Dell was such a relief. Back onto flat ground and good paths…hurray! Eventually Lochranza was in sightand I stopped at a bench for a rest. I had completely lost track of time at this point, the sky had been so grey all day that I really thought it was about 6pm. I felt so exhausted but trudged down the side of the Loch in search of the campsite for the night.

At the end of the Loch I wasn’t sure which way I was going so stopped to ask a friendly looking man resting on some logs. He dug out his map and figured out where the campsite was and then told me he was waiting for his wife to get the car as he had walked too far that day…I knew the feeling. When he said I probably had another half mile to go I think I must have looked so crestfallen he took pity and offered me a lift. Bless the kindness of strangers – a lovely couple from Aberdeen saved the day!

Got booked into the campsite at 2.30pm – I’m not sure where my body clock was but it thought it was at least four hours ahead! Tent up in drizzle, bed prepared and I crawled into my sleeping bag to warm up and rest for a little while before dragging myself out for some tea and to find a plug to charge my phone.

It was a really,really tough day, I felt exhausted and utterly depleted. My feet were blistered and painful and I could feel a change of plan coming on…

Arran Coastal Way – Brodick to Sannox

I’ve been and not quite conquered the Arran Coastal Way for reasons I’ll go into later but I’ll attempt to give a run down of each day for anyone who’s interested!

The first day was mainly taken up travelling, starting out at 10.30 to catch the train to Glasgow Central and then on to Ardrossan to meet up with the ferry. I love trains and ferries so I find this part quite enjoyable, even the waiting between connections is fun if there is coffee and people watching involved. I had booked my train ticket from Oxenholme station (nr Kendal) to Glasgow back in January for just over £20 return and picked up a ‘Rail and Sail’ ticket which covers travel from Glasgow to Brodick for £22.90 from Glasgow Central. The plan was to walk a section each day carrying all my stuff with me to camp along the way. (I’d like to add at this point that my rucksack must have weighed in excess of 15kg so not ultralight by any stretch of the imagination!)

I arrived in Brodick at 4.15pm to a few grey clouds and a little bit of wind and headed straight off knowing that I had until about 9pm to get to my intended wild camp site at Sannox approx 8 miles away. Unfortunately both my phone and solar charger were slowly dying so didn’t manage to get too many photo’s along the way.

I think I had underestimated how much of this walk was uphill, heading up into Merkland Woods above the castle at Brodick and then following broad forestry paths for what felt like miles. Just as I thought I was coming back down to the coast, up it went again! The views through the gaps in the trees were amazing and I couldn’t wait to get back down near the sea way down there. I was getting tired and ended up slipping at one point and smacked down on my bum, I felt like a turtle trying to get back up with a fully loaded rucksack attached!!

Merkland Woods – looking back down to the ferry.

Eventually I came down to the road and walked along to Corrie, finding a handy water tap at the village hall there (also toilets!) and the lovely pier complete with sheep! I must have looked shattered as a local came cycling up to let me know I could camp at the village hall if I wanted to. Thinking that Sannox wasn’t very far, I thought I’d push on and make camp so I was that bit further on for the next day. That last mile or so was tough, I was sooo tired and feeling disheartened that it seemed such a struggle on day one!

Pier at Corrie complete with sheep!

Tent up, food eaten, bed ready, woolly hat and numerous layers on…sleep! The rain and wind woke me a couple of times but my first night wild camping on my own was absolutely fine. The tent held up to everything thrown at it and I felt safe even if a little fed up.

Arran Coastal Way – Have map, will travel.

First step: actually figure out where you’re going!

There seems to be a lack of write-up’s about the Arran Coastal Way online, not really sure why and not sure whether this is something to worry about or not! I did find a great blog ‘Ruth’s Coastal Walk’ which covers Arran, as well as her progress around the UK which makes for inspirational reading for some future adventures.

I have, however, managed to get hold of a map showing the coastal way route, a teeny tiny little map that folds up really small, weighs next to nothing and is waterproof…who knew these things existed?? Obviously not me, but maybe I’m the only one who didn’t! This, and the very imformative Rucksack Reader guide (also on rainproof paper!) should be more than enough to guide me around Arran. It details each leg of the journey with maps and interesting facts, as well as advising where shops, pubs and other amenities are.

Routes, information, history and rainproof.
Waterproof, double sided teeny tiny map!

Arran Coastal Way – Beginning…

I’ve done a few solo day walks but never a long distance one so this was on the top of my Bucket List for this year. There are so many in the UK that can be done, some on our doorstep where we live, but I’ve decided on the Arran Coastal Way for my first foray into Long Distance walking and into solo wild camping…nothing like diving in at the deep end!

Why the Arran Coastal Way? Well… it’s an island I’ve been to before, that time in a beaten up campervan with the whole family on an amazing adventure around Bute, Arran and the Kintyre peninsula. We stayed on a few campsites but mainly ‘wild campervanning’ . This is going back a fair few years and it is still my son’s favourite holiday ever.

As I’m a bit of a woose, I wanted to be somewhere vaguely familiar and easy to get back to civilisation on my first solo walk / camp. There is a great bus service that runs frequently around the island so I know I can get back to the ferry point pretty easily if needed.

And, of course, Arran is beautiful and who doesn’t want to spend a week by the sea on a Scottish Island!?

The plan so far is to go in Spring, hopefully before the midges come out in force but when the weather will not be too wet and miserable